Archive for the ‘7.12’ Category

Piazza delle Erbe is a square in Verona, northern Italy. Once it was the town’s forum during the time of the Roman Empire. Piazza dei Signori, is a square in the historic center of Verona , next to Piazza delle Erbe .

Verona’s central square Piazza delle Erbe was initially the site of a Roman forum but is now surrounded by palazzi and the venue for a daily market. Many of the wares on offer are of the ho-hum T-shirt variety, but enough fresh produce from the Veneto is on sale to lend an air of authenticity to the marketplace. Standing amid the hubbub is a statue of Madonna Verona, presiding over these scenes of workaday life since 1368. The adjoining Piazza dei Signori is more somber and was for many centuries the scene of such civic affairs as assemblies of the medieval citizens’ council that played a large part in the city government. In the middle of the square is a statue of Dante, who spent part of his years in exile from Florence in the beautiful 13th-century palazzo of the Scaligeri family, which faces the piazza. Walking between these two beautiful squares involves a risk, but only to the truly honest – a whalebone suspended in the Arco della Costa (Arch of the Rib) will fall on the first person to walk beneath it who has never told a lie.

Piazza delle Erbe

Piazza delle Erbe

Piazza dei Signori

Piazza dei Signori

Piazza delle Erbe

Piazza delle Erbe

Piazza dei Signori

Piazza dei Signori

Piazza delle Erbe is a square in Verona, northern Italy. Once it was the town’s forum during the time of the Roman Empire. Piazza dei Signori, is a square in the historic center of Verona , next to Piazza delle Erbe .

Verona’s central square Piazza delle Erbe was initially the site of a Roman forum but is now surrounded by palazzi and the venue for a daily market. Many of the wares on offer are of the ho-hum T-shirt variety, but enough fresh produce from the Veneto is on sale to lend an air of authenticity to the marketplace. Standing amid the hubbub is a statue of Madonna Verona, presiding over these scenes of workaday life since 1368. The adjoining Piazza dei Signori is more somber and was for many centuries the scene of such civic affairs as assemblies of the medieval citizens’ council that played a large part in the city government. In the middle of the square is a statue of Dante, who spent part of his years in exile from Florence in the beautiful 13th-century palazzo of the Scaligeri family, which faces the piazza. Walking between these two beautiful squares involves a risk, but only to the truly honest – a whalebone suspended in the Arco della Costa (Arch of the Rib) will fall on the first person to walk beneath it who has never told a lie.

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The headquarters of the Banca Popolare di Verona is a building designed by Carlo Scarpa in collaboration with Arrigo Rudi, who has completed the master’s work after his death. The collaboration between the Banca Popolare di Verona and Carlo Scarpa began in 1973 and ended in 1978 , the year of his death, while the building was completed in 1981 according to the original project by the Venetian. It is located in the historic center in Verona , and overlooks the Nogara Square and Convent Lane.

Detail of the facade

Carved-in detail on the exterior

The window extend out of the facade plane

The facade is divided, from bottom to top, in socket marble, the central part plastered and lodge in steel.

Carlo Scarpa faced two issues of importance and related to each other: first, the relationship that was to be born between old and new headquarters, and the second, having part of the facade on Piazza Nogara, so with a view front and side of Convent Lane, then with a foreshortened view of the building. The answer to the first issue was the attempt to understand the building of the old location without copying it, as the new headquarters would be an extension of the old and that was surrounding them. The second difficulty conceiving of the solution found on the square as a neutral, almost flat, with a bow window as the only element that emerges from the edge of the facade, bay windows, which still loses plasticity, since the square is the front view of the preferred and furthermore is at the top. Also note that the circular windows are the offices of the Director and Deputy Director, then there is a link between the organization and hierarchy of the interior and exterior. The part on the alley instead is provided with plastic elements and effects of light stronger, since in this case the view is foreshortened, and the oblique vision enhances the three-dimensional reading of this part of the prospectus . So this is where part of the four bay windows , the massive gateway, and the cut to the ground. Despite the high plasticity of this part there is no interference with the oldest site of the Bank, as the most neutral (next to the old site) acts as a filter. Compared to that of the seat pre-existing, the facade Scarpa is lower and slightly backward, and apparently is hooked to it only at the level of the base and the socket, while the intermediate part is almost autonomous.

A practical response to the problem of relations between old and new sedation is the reworking of some sophisticated elements, such as shelves of balconies , shaped triglyph, stretch and shrink, making the thin vertical strips that have the function of runoff , connecting the circular and rectangular windows, or the band molded to the seat of the oldest Banca Popolare di Verona separates the earth from the first floor, in the new building becomes becoming the frame on which you set the lodge.

Luckily we went inside the building and got some interior shots, which will shown below.

Interior shot showing the varies of volume and the fabulous play of light in this building

The corridor is wrapped with wooden finishes, I think the use of wood is to reflect light inside of the space to make it brighter.

It is amazing how the opening is create above the door to bring light in

Detail of the handrail

Another detail shows the handrail

Windows looking inside out, I can feel the different layers of facade, the views outside are framed and light are controlled through the two layers of apertures

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Castelvecchio Museum (Italian: Museo Civico di Castelvecchio) is a museum in Verona, northern Italy, located in the eponymous medieval castle. Restoration by the architect Carlo Scarpa, between 1959 and 1973, has enhanced the appearance of the building and exhibits. Scarpa’s unique architectural style is visible in the details for doorways, staircases, furnishings, and even fixtures designed to hold a specific piece of artwork.

Above are some photos of Carlo Scarpa’s garden:

Between 1958 and 1974, Castelvecchio, underwent an important and reinstallation of the museum spaces, designed and supercised for the city of Verona by the architect Carlo Scarpa during the directorship of the art historian Licisco Magagnato. The antique arms count, reduced at the beginning of the 20th century to an Italianate garden, was transformed by Scarpa into an extraordinary morden courtyard that complements the architecture with geometrical logic and the use of both traditional Veronese materials, such as Prun stone, and concrete.

This space is both the prologue to the museum visit and a resting slong the route. Several important works in stone are also sited within the garden: two 19th century fountains, an early 13th century sarcophagus, the central rose from the medieval floor of the church of Sant’Anastasia, installed here like an emblem next to the entrance. In addition, the site contains a medieval sundial and the celebrated equestrian statue of Cangrande I della Scala.

Castelvecchio was a castle in ruins before Scarpa was commissioned to restore it as a museum.

Scarpa then used modern materials to renovate Castelvecchio, the result is a surprisingly harmonical composition between old and new.

Scarpa’s attention to details is wonderful. Here’s how he designed his own railings.

He build the stairs accommodated to left and right steps that lead towards the old Castelvecchio.

Ornate metal lattice door designed by Carlo Scarpa.

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Today is our first day in Italy; after taken the flight AA198 from New York to Milan. We stopped in Verona.

Verona is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy, with approx. 265,000 inhabitants and one of the seven chef-lieus of the region. It is the second largest city municipality in the region and the third of northeast Italy. The metropolitan area of Verona covers an area of 1,426 km2 (550.58 sq mi) and has a population of 714,274 inhabitants. It is one of the main tourist destinations in northern Italy, owing to its artistic heritage, several annual fairs, shows, and operas, such as the lyrical season in the Arena, the ancient amphitheater built by the Romans. The city has been awarded World Heritage Site status by UNESCO because of its urban structure and architecture.

Above is some photos I took along the way to show a general idea of the city.